Multiple ways to access QEMU Monitor Protocol (QMP)

Once QEMU is built, to get a finer understanding of it, or even for plain old debugging, having familiarity with QMP (QEMU Monitor Protocol) is quite useful. QMP allows applications — like libvirt — to communicate with a running QEMU’s instance. There are a few different ways to access the QEMU monitor to query the guest, get device (eg: PCI, block, etc) information, modify the guest state (useful to understand the block layer operations) using QMP commands. This post discusses a few aspects of it.

Access QMP via libvirt’s qemu-monitor-command
Libvirt had this capability for a long time, and this is the simplest. It can be invoked by virsh — on a running guest, in this case, called ‘devstack’:

$ virsh qemu-monitor-command devstack \
--pretty '{"execute":"query-kvm"}'
{
    "return": {
        "enabled": true,
        "present": true
    },
    "id": "libvirt-8"
}

In the above example, I ran the simple command query-kvm which checks if (1) the host is capable of running KVM (2) and if KVM is enabled. Refer below for a list of possible ‘qeury’ commands.

QMP via telnet
To access monitor via any other way, we need to have qemu instance running in control mode, via telnet:

$ ./x86_64-softmmu/qemu-system-x86_64 \
  --enable-kvm -smp 2 -m 1024 \
  /export/images/el6box1.qcow2 \
  -qmp tcp:localhost:4444,server --monitor stdio
QEMU waiting for connection on: tcp::127.0.0.14444,server
VNC server running on `127.0.0.1:5900'
QEMU 1.4.50 monitor - type 'help' for more information
(qemu)

And, from a different shell, connect to that listening port 4444 via telnet:

$ telnet localhost 4444

Trying 127.0.0.1...
Connected to localhost.
Escape character is '^]'.
{"QMP": {"version": {"qemu": {"micro": 50, "minor": 4, "major": 1}, "package": ""}, "capabilities": []}}

We have to first enable QMP capabilities. This needs to be run before invoking any other commands, do:

{ "execute": "qmp_capabilities" }

QMP via unix socket
First, invoke the qemu binary in control mode using qmp, and create a unix socket as below:

$ ./x86_64-softmmu/qemu-system-x86_64 \
  --enable-kvm -smp 2 -m 1024 \
  /export/images/el6box1.qcow2 \
  -qmp unix:./qmp-sock,server --monitor stdio
QEMU waiting for connection on: unix:./qmp-sock,server

A few different ways to connect to the above qemu instance running in control mode, vi QMP:

  1. Firstly, via nc :

    $ nc -U ./qmp-sock
    {"QMP": {"version": {"qemu": {"micro": 50, "minor": 4, "major": 1}, "package": ""}, "capabilities": []}}
    
  2. But, with the above, you have to manually enable the QMP capabilities, and type each command in JSON syntax. It’s a bit cumbersome, & no history of commands typed is saved.

  3. Next, a more simpler way — a python script called qmp-shell is located in the QEMU source tree, under qemu/scripts/qmp/qmp-shell, which hides some details — like manually running the qmp_capabilities.

    Connect to the unix socket using the qmp-shell script:

    $ ./qmp-shell ../qmp-sock 
    Welcome to the QMP low-level shell!
    Connected to QEMU 1.4.50
    
    (QEMU) 
    

    Then, just hit the key, and all the possible commands would be listed. To see a list of query commands:

    (QEMU) query-<TAB>
    query-balloon               query-commands              query-kvm                   query-migrate-capabilities  query-uuid
    query-block                 query-cpu-definitions       query-machines              query-name                  query-version
    query-block-jobs            query-cpus                  query-mice                  query-pci                   query-vnc
    query-blockstats            query-events                query-migrate               query-status                
    query-chardev               query-fdsets                query-migrate-cache-size    query-target                
    (QEMU) 
    
  4. Finally, we can also acess the unix socket using socat and rlwrap. Thanks to upstream qemu developer Markus Armbruster for this hint.

    Invoke it this way, also execute a couple of commands — qmp_capabilities, and query-kvm, to view the response from the server.

    $ rlwrap -H ~/.qmp_history \
      socat UNIX-CONNECT:./qmp-sock STDIO
    {"QMP": {"version": {"qemu": {"micro": 50, "minor": 4, "major": 1}, "package": ""}, "capabilities": []}}
    {"execute":"qmp_capabilities"}
    {"return": {}}
    { "execute": "query-kvm" }
    {"return": {"enabled": true, "present": true}}
    

    Where, qmp_history contains recently ran QMP commands in JSON syntax. And rlwrap adds decent editing capabilities, recursive search & history. So, once you run all your commands, the ~/.qmp_history has a neat stack of all the QMP commands in JSON syntax.

    For instance, this is what my ~/.qmp_history file contains as I write this:

    $ cat ~/.qmp_history
    { "execute": "qmp_capabilities" }
    { "execute": "query-version" }
    { "execute": "query-events" }
    { "execute": "query-chardev" }
    { "execute": "query-block" }
    { "execute": "query-blockstats" }
    { "execute": "query-cpus" }
    { "execute": "query-pci" }
    { "execute": "query-kvm" }
    { "execute": "query-mice" }
    { "execute": "query-vnc" }
    { "execute": "query-spice " }
    { "execute": "query-uuid" }
    { "execute": "query-migrate" }
    { "execute": "query-migrate-capabilities" }
    { "execute": "query-balloon" }
    

To illustrate, I ran a few query commands (noted above) which provides an informative response from the server — no change is done to the state of the guest — so these can be executed safely.

I personally prefer the libvirt way, & accessing via unix socket with socat & rlwrap.

NOTE: To try each of the above variants, fisrst quit — type quit on the (qemu) shell — the qemu instance running in control mode, reinvoke it, then access it via one of the 3 different ways.

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1 Comment

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One response to “Multiple ways to access QEMU Monitor Protocol (QMP)

  1. Ilya

    That was quite helpful, thank you very much! Your post has a bit broader info on the topic – qmp’s man page is quite concise :)
    Btw, could you help me out with my question regarding running multiple virtual machines on one socket with ‘-qmp’? Would be great if you help me out http://serverfault.com/questions/569603/qemus-qmp-to-listen-on-same-socket

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